Imagining Clinical Depression

depression-242024_960_720Imagine, if you can, having just tragically lost everything and everyone you have ever loved yet something has blocked all memory of it just out of conscious range and replaced it with a false reality. That sounds like the premise of a science fiction story, doesn’t it? But if you can truly imagine that lonely and fathomless emptiness, inexplicably nagging sense of bitter grief and the suspicious feeling that everything around you is a surrealistic façade, you have just imagined living with clinical depression on a good day.

On a bad day, it is lying helplessly in bed in hopeless despair, desperately praying to God to end you, even or especially if it means total oblivion, and vehemently cursing yourself for not having the backbone to do the job yourself.

If you can’t imagine it, consider yourself lucky. Millions of people live with these feelings every day – month after month, year after year. While there is treatment, for some, it is like merely putting a band-aid on a bullet wound. For others, treatment makes matters even worse. A common side-effect for most antidepressants is suicide.

This entry was posted in Depression, Suicide and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

1 Response to Imagining Clinical Depression

  1. chefjemichel says:

    Thank you for presenting this challenging subject matter!
    I appreciate: “While there is treatment, for some, it is like merely putting a band-aid on a bullet wound. For others, treatment makes matters even worse. A common side-effect for most antidepressants is suicide.” I know from direct experience and from first-hand observations that “treatment” has by and large been just as you described it here. However I also see that conventional medical treatment is being surpassed by extra-medical approaches that (among others) include addressing the brain chemistry basis for depression. I have blogged about this at a couple of my CureZone Blogs. Here’s one of them:
    http://www.curezone.org/blogs/fm.asp?i=2137324